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Wednesday, May 19 2021

Block I-1

Upon its release in 2009, the world’s first cryptocurrency, Bitcoin was worth next to nothing, valued at only $0.0008. In 2021, we saw the “king of crypto” surge to beyond $60,000 per single coin but it took a massive rollercoaster of major highs and lows to get there. One thing that most investors agree on …

While millennials and GenZ can sometimes be wary about investing and in many cases they have little capital to work with, the availability of social media and online investment tools is making it easier and more accessible for this age group to learn more about investing. In fact, during the pandemic, 16% of Britons aged …

If you have heard about the meteoric rise of bitcoin from its early days of being worth mere fractions of a cent in 2009 to its most recent peak to over $61,000 in March 2021, then you are probably lamenting over not having enough foresight to be one of the early adopters that managed to …

Block I-2

Apple has acquired about 100 companies in the past six years, Chief Executive Tim Cook revealed. That’s equivalent to one company every three to four weeks, he said Tuesday at Apple’s annual shareholder meeting. Apple recently delivered its best-ever quarter in terms of revenue, taking in $111.4 billion (£78.7 billion) in the first quarter of …

Less than a year old, Clubhouse already ticks the boxes for being the next big thing: big hype super-famous users controversy bans a massive valuation (though it’s obviously not making any money). Here’s what you need to know. Why should I care? It’s making waves around the world, from the U.S. (where the app got …

A low-cost electric vehicle (EV) selling in China for $4,500 (£3,200) is now outselling Tesla’s more expensive cars. The small car is proving a big hit for state-owned SAIC Motor, China’s leading automaker. The Hong Guang Mini EV is built as part of a joint venture with U.S. auto giant General Motors (GM). Last month, …

Australia has passed a world-first law aimed at making Google and Facebook pay for news content on their platforms. The legislation had been fiercely opposed by the U.S. tech giants, with Facebook blocking all news content for Australians because of the dispute. Facebook agreed to reverse its decision after robust negotiations with the government, resulting …

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